Posted on September 6, 2019

Escargot: A Classic French Delicacy

The origination of the word escargot dates back to 1892 and translates to “edible snail.” This French delicacy is usually prepared with the Helix pomatia species, one of the few types of snails that are edible. These snails are typically larger in size compared to other species, thus making them perfect to eat.

The traditional way to prepare this intricate dish starts by removing the snail from its shell. Snails are then cooked in a sauce such as garlic butter and herb, chicken stock, or with an alcohol base that can include wine or brandy. Here at Le Manhattan Bistro, our Burgundy Escargot features our chef’s interpretation of garlic butter and herb preparation style.

Great cuisine isn’t just about preparation. Next comes presentation and plating. The snail is then placed back into its shell and served in a custom ceramic or stainless steel escargot plate. If you do not have this special dish, a trick of the trade is to delicately lay the snails on a bed of kosher salt; this helps stabilize the shell on the dish or platter, and will make you look like a true culinary artist!

Gracefully consuming this gourmet treat can be tricky. That’s why custom escargot tongs and forks are usually used to help make the experience a classy and clean one. You want every tasty morsel to land in your mouth, not your lap!

If you have never eaten this dish before, the texture is similar to an oyster, clam, or mushroom — usually smooth, yet rubbery and gooey. The snail typically takes on the flavor of the sauce in which it is prepared. When you are enjoying this savory dish, we recommend having a loaf of crusty French bread handy so you can soak up all the delicious remains of the sauce.

Reserve your table now!

Join us at Le Manhattan Bistro for this exquisite bite and pair it with one of our many French wines. Or, if you don’t enjoy escargot, select from numerous other hand-crafted small plates that we offer to suit every taste. Make your dinner reservation with us today. Bonjour for now!

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